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US companies - over here and influencing our health policy?
It’s not just General Mills. There seems to be a common theme emerging amongst those who have made it onto our labelling wall of shame. Heinz, Coca-Cola, Kelloggs (and even Cadbury via Mondelez) are all American-owned corporations. Could it be that the US headquarters of these companies are dragging their feet (or just being plain obstructionist) about signing up their UK brands to the new labelling scheme?
If that is indeed the case, why should America - years behind the UK and Europe in terms of most of its health and nutrition policies, and infamous for its well-financed and (sadly) hugely effective corporate food lobby - be dictating what happens on our supermarket shelves here? Why should they be preventing millions of British consumers from having the best nutrition advice on products?

US companies - over here and influencing our health policy?

It’s not just General Mills. There seems to be a common theme emerging amongst those who have made it onto our labelling wall of shame. Heinz, Coca-Cola, Kelloggs (and even Cadbury via Mondelez) are all American-owned corporations. Could it be that the US headquarters of these companies are dragging their feet (or just being plain obstructionist) about signing up their UK brands to the new labelling scheme?

If that is indeed the case, why should America - years behind the UK and Europe in terms of most of its health and nutrition policies, and infamous for its well-financed and (sadly) hugely effective corporate food lobby - be dictating what happens on our supermarket shelves here? Why should they be preventing millions of British consumers from having the best nutrition advice on products?

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Wall of Shame entry #8 - General Mills
It appears that the main sticking point to Nestle not adopting the traffic light labelling system for their cereals seems to be the other half of their breakfast partnership: General Mills.  Word on the street is that it is the American-owned company which is stirring up the cornflakes / shredding the deal / not-quik to sign up / saying cheerio to better labelling (insert your chosen cereal pun here). 
General Mills are conspiciously absent from the list of manufacturers who have agreed to adopt and promote the new labelling scheme. And if it turns out to be the case they are actively blocking Nestle from going ahead with the changing the labels on their jointly-owned cereals, then General Mills deserves to go straight to the top of our wall of shame. 

Wall of Shame entry #8 - General Mills

It appears that the main sticking point to Nestle not adopting the traffic light labelling system for their cereals seems to be the other half of their breakfast partnership: General Mills.  Word on the street is that it is the American-owned company which is stirring up the cornflakes / shredding the deal / not-quik to sign up / saying cheerio to better labelling (insert your chosen cereal pun here). 

General Mills are conspiciously absent from the list of manufacturers who have agreed to adopt and promote the new labelling scheme. And if it turns out to be the case they are actively blocking Nestle from going ahead with the changing the labels on their jointly-owned cereals, then General Mills deserves to go straight to the top of our wall of shame. 

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Wall of Shame entry #7 - Nestle Cereals

Cereal Partners UK, the local division of Cereal Partners Worldwide, Nestle’s breakfast cereals venture with General Mills, will not adopt the label.  [Source: Just-Food]

They kept this one quiet, did Nestle (and the Government)! Fair enough, the small print of the Department of Health’s press release on launch day said that it was only Nestle’s “fully-owned” companies that had agreed to introduce the new traffic-light label. But it took us a while to twig that this did not include one of Nestle’s biggest product ranges - breakfast cereals.  
We’ve always wondered how the Responsibility Deal treats companies who’ve signed up but have licensing deals for some of their main brands with other companies who aren’t signatures (Pepsi and Britvic is one such example).  This is a similar problem - and again it’s consumers who are losing out.

Wall of Shame entry #7 - Nestle Cereals

Cereal Partners UK, the local division of Cereal Partners Worldwide, Nestle’s breakfast cereals venture with General Mills, will not adopt the label.  [Source: Just-Food]

They kept this one quiet, did Nestle (and the Government)! Fair enough, the small print of the Department of Health’s press release on launch day said that it was only Nestle’s “fully-owned” companies that had agreed to introduce the new traffic-light label. But it took us a while to twig that this did not include one of Nestle’s biggest product ranges - breakfast cereals.  

We’ve always wondered how the Responsibility Deal treats companies who’ve signed up but have licensing deals for some of their main brands with other companies who aren’t signatures (Pepsi and Britvic is one such example).  This is a similar problem - and again it’s consumers who are losing out.

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Wall of Shame entry #6: Heinz

Not yet signed up to the new labelling scheme 

Source: FT [£]

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Kellogg’s - that famous producer of cheese and beans

Nice to know Kellogg’s is sticking up for its fellow labelling refusenik manufacturers. In a quote they gave to the Voice of Russia, Kellogg’s said:

Traffic light labels don’t enable consumers to make better and healthier choices, especially within the same categories.

“For example, low fat cheese has the same traffic light label as high fat cheese and reduced salt baked beans have the same traffic light as standard baked beans even though they have 30 % less salt.”

So, nothing about what they actually produce and market: cereals of varying degrees of sugariness.  

Tags: kelloggs
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Wall of Shame entry #5 - Kellogg’s

not yet signed up to the new labelling scheme

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Wall of Shame entry #4 - Unilever

Not yet signed up to the new labelling scheme.

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"Our work on labelling is not yet done. We need people to keep up pressure on companies who haven’t yet signed up to the new scheme."

— Public Health Minister Anna Soubry MP - at BHF parliamentary reception, 19 June 2013